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Sleep Apnea Leading to Forgetfulness? | Sleep Apnea Glen Burnie

Did you ever consider that memory loss, depression, and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) might all be connected?

Researchers have long known that memory and depression are linked, but now new research shows that people with obstructive sleep apnea have trouble remembering specific details about their lives, making them vulnerable to depression. With approximately 22 million people in the U.S. and 936 million worldwide suffering from sleep apnea, it is an issue that must be addressed.

Episodic Memory vs. Semantic Memory

For a better understanding of research, it is helpful to distinguish semantic memory from episodic memory. Throughout our lives, we acquire facts, meanings, and concepts about the world that make up our semantic memory. Among our semantic memories are names of states, objects, and different types of food. While semantic memory can be rooted in a personal context (such as a sibling’s name), it is consolidated in the mind as purely factual information. Episodic memory is our memory of events and experiences specific to our lives, also known as autobiographical memory. In episodic memory, the emotional charge and context usually remain.

For example, to distinguish between the two types of memory, a semantic memory could be the name of your first-grade teacher, whereas an episodic memory could be what it was like on the first day of first grade. There is an association between depression and lower semantic memory, which means that depressed patients are less able to remember specific details regarding events or experiences.

Diving Deeper into Research

Keeping in mind the literature supporting the link between depression and low semantic memory, researchers compared an assessment of adults with OSA to an assessment of healthy adults. They asked participants to recall certain autobiographical events from their childhood, early adulthood, and recent lives. Overgeneral memories were significantly more prevalent among those with OSA, 52.3% versus 18.9% among the control group. Even though their episodic memory was intact, they struggled to remember the specifics. The researchers noted that this was likely due to interrupted sleep patterns since research has shown that good sleep is necessary to consolidate memory. Although the exact correlation between sleep apnea, memory loss, and depression remains unclear, this study shared by our sleep apnea dentist in 21061 highlights the importance of further research to determine if treatment can make up for lost memories. The good news is that sleep apnea treatment improves some of the cognitive consequences of the disorder.

Depression symptoms

All of us need to evaluate our emotional well-being regularly, but it’s particularly important for those with (treated or untreated) sleep apnea. According to a 2014 study, 46% of people with OSA have depressive symptoms. The following are some of the most common signs of depression:

  • A persistent feeling of sadness
  • Feeling fatigued
  • Concentration and memory problems
  • Feelings of hopelessness and helplessness
  • Easily irritated
  • Overeating or loss of appetite
  • A constant feeling of anxiety
  • Thoughts or attempts at suicide

In combination with loud, persistent snoring, constant fatigue, and waking up gasping for air, depressive symptoms may point to obstructive sleep apnea, which can compromise your health overall.

The good news is that sleep apnea can be effectively treated. An appropriate diagnosis can be made by a specialist if you think you may have sleep apnea. If you are diagnosed, you will most likely be offered a CPAP or an oral appliance. While CPAP is the gold standard in sleep apnea treatment, it is not regarded as the most effective treatment due to low adherence among patients.

Please contact our sleep apnea office in Glen Burnie, MD today to schedule a consultation. Getting to the bottom of your sleep problems is the first step to figuring out the best treatment option for you.

Chesapeake Sleep Center
Phone: 410-729-6794
7711 Quarterfield Road, Suite C-1
Glen Burnie, MD 21061

Sleep Apnea and Your Mental Health | Sleep Apnea Glen Burnie MD

Once we learn about chronic health conditions, it’s easy to fall down a rabbit hole. One such condition is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The condition is chronic since it occurs every time you sleep and can only be managed through therapy. The condition rarely goes away by itself.

During sleep, what appears to be a mechanical problem with breathing turns out to be much more complex in its effects on the rest of our bodies. You may not know, for example, that OSA, if left untreated, is associated with a wide array of chronic health conditions. People with OSA may develop a hidden case of high blood pressure. Similarly, untreated OSA can cause Type 2 diabetes.

Could OSA contribute to mental health problems as well? Sadly, the answer is yes.

Psychological effects of obstructive sleep apnea

For many years, research has been conducted to identify associations between OSA and mental health issues. According to recent studies, there is a clear link between OSA and mood disorders like depression.

In fact, OSA contributes to several mental health concerns besides major depression disorder (MDD), such as generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, substance abuse, and panic attacks.

Sleep apnea, and depression

There are often similarities in the symptoms experienced by people with MDD and OSA, such as:

  • Fatigue during the day
  • Concentration issues
  • excessive irritability
  • Gaining weight

Someone who complains of mental health issues such as depression may, after going through an OSA screening, discover that they also suffer from sleep apnea.

The VA conducted a large study that found people with MDD have a five-times greater chance of having OSA, with more than half of the OSA patients in their study meeting the criteria for MDD. It can also be the case with chronic insomnia, which is also well known to overlap with major depressive disorder (MDD).

Low serotonin levels appear to link both conditions, although in different ways. In the brain, serotonin is responsible for regulating mood, so low levels mean negative emotions. Serotonin also plays a role in the nerve function of the upper airway during sleep. Inadequate supply could play a role in the complex set of conditions leading to OSA.

Researchers from the VA study found that, despite controlling for obesity as a risk factor, OSA was associated with both mood disorders and anxiety disorders.

Sleep apnea, and anxiety

A person with OSA is nearly twice as likely to suffer from a generalized anxiety disorder. According to one study, the more severe the case of OSA, the higher the chance of anxiety symptoms. In fact, over two-thirds of people who dealt with anxiety also suffered from severe OSA.

Sleep apnea and mental health problems

Is there a way to move forward when an individual is diagnosed with OSA and depression or anxiety?

As a general rule, it is best to treat OSA as the primary condition, as it may contribute to depression and anxiety. There is a good chance that depressive or anxious symptoms will subside or even disappear once they are treated.

Additionally, certain antidepressant and anti-anxiety medications (such as benzodiazepines and other sedatives or hypnotics) can actually worsen an existing case of OSA. This might explain why your doctor may suggest at least starting with positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy (such as CPAP) before treating the mental health symptoms. According to research, CPAP use can reduce anxiety and depression severity, especially for women.

Make sure you don’t go at it alone.

It can be difficult to know when having one mental or physical health issue will lead to another, but this does happen. Unfortunately, chronic illness is like that. It is possible for one health issue to lead to another over time.

A person with OSA may suffer from problematic sleep caused by ongoing stress unrelated to their condition. A pandemic is an example of stress-induced insomnia and disturbed sleep affecting millions in 2020.

If you’re unsure about the source of your sleep problems, don’t guess why or ignore the symptoms. Consider consulting with your physician and a sleep apnea specialist. With their assistance, you can determine whether you have any mental or physical health concerns that need to be addressed. Our sleep apnea center in Glen Burnie, MD specializes in treating sleep apnea patients. To schedule an appointment, call our sleep apnea dentist in Glen Burnie today. Ultimately, figuring out the problem and treating it, as well as getting more sleep, are your top priorities.

Chesapeake Sleep Center
Phone: 410-729-6794
7711 Quarterfield Road, Suite C-1
Glen Burnie, MD 21061

Could Sleep Apnea be Causing Your High Blood Pressure? | Paul Miller, DDS

Stethoscope and heart on heartbeat printout Sleep Apnea 21061

In the United States, 80% of people with mild to moderate sleep apnea go undiagnosed! Comorbidities, such as high blood pressure, often accompany sleep apnea, making it essential that everyone with sleep apnea address health conditions.

What is Sleep Apnea?

Sleep apnea occurs when the soft tissues in the throat collapse during sleep and restrict the airway. When air passes over the restriction, a vibration occurs, emitting the sound we know as snoring. If you have been told you snore often, or think you may be snoring, then you should get tested for sleep apnea. Once the restriction is overcome, the brain will wake the body to resume breathing. If you are constantly woken up, you will not be able to get enough restorative sleep and may end up developing other health concerns, such as high blood pressure.

What is hypertension (high blood pressure)?

Your blood pressure is the amount of pressure your pumping blood applies to your blood vessels. When your blood vessels are pushed too hard, you get hypertension, or high blood pressure.

Hypertension is the result of the relationship between your systolic blood pressure (the pressure when your heart is pumping) and your diastolic blood pressure (the pressure when your heart isn’t pumping). According to the American College of Cardiology, hypertensive patients have a systolic or diastolic pressure greater than 130+/80+.

Hypertension is a serious condition because it can lead to heart disease and heart failure. 50% of patients with hypertension also suffer from obstructive sleep apnea.

What is the relationship between sleep apnea and high blood pressure?

A patient with untreated sleep apnea is 2.6 times more likely to suffer from heart disease and heart failure than a patient without sleep apnea. The brain works harder at night to keep your body breathing, so there is no apparent drop in blood pressure in patients with sleep apnea. A person without sleep apnea experiences a decrease in blood pressure during the night. This dip is normal because the heart slows down at night to allow it to recover.

At night, blood oxygen levels are also supposed to decrease in a healthy individual. When someone is struggling to breathe during the night, their blood oxygen levels do not have the opportunity to decrease, thus increasing blood pressure. The result of this is high blood pressure, which can lead to heart disease in the long run.

It is important to note that hypertension is associated with obstructive sleep apnea. There is less clarity regarding whether central sleep apnea (in which the brain does not communicate adequately to control breathing) and hypertension are related.

How can sleep apnea and heart disease be treated?

Often, a whole-body approach is needed to treat sleep apnea and heart disease. The only way to determine whether you have sleep apnea is to undergo a sleep study. At-home sleep studies are convenient because you don’t have to go to a sleep lab; you can sleep in your own bed while a device monitors your sleeping patterns. You may be prescribed an oral device instead of a CPAP machine if you are diagnosed with sleep apnea. Other treatments, such as weight loss and diet management, may also help treat sleep apnea and hypertension. If you believe you suffer from either of these conditions, we recommend you consult with a cardiologist and sleep apnea specialist for any underlying issues that could be affecting your health.

For more information, please contact us today. By giving them a better night’s rest, we have been able to help hundreds of patients not only sleep better but also resolve other medical conditions they were dealing with. Our Glen Burnie Sleep Apnea office will guide you every step of the way to sleeping better!

Chesapeake Sleep Center
Phone: 410-729-6794
Url: https://chesapeakesleepapnea.com/
7711 Quarterfield Road, Suite C-1
Glen Burnie, MD 21061

Need a Nap? Sleep Apnea May be Your Problem | Sleep Apnea 21061

Woman asleep on laptop Sleep Apnea Near Me

Millions of Americans suffer from sleep apnea, causing them to have trouble sleeping, drowsiness during the day, and fatigue at night. It’s a serious condition that makes it hard to breathe at night and can block the air moving into and out of the lungs. Sleep apnea causes poor sleep as well as a number of other health issues. 

There are three types of sleep apnea that might affect your breathing during the night.

  • Obstructive sleep apnea is the most common type of sleep apnea. During this condition, the muscles in the back of the throat relax, closing the airway and physically blocking your lungs.
  • Central sleep apnea is less common and originates in the brain. During sleep, your brain fails to control your breathing muscles. This will cause shallow or slow breathing, or even breathing pauses.
  • Mixed sleep apnea occurs when a person has both obstructive and central sleep apnea. This type of sleep apnea is characterized by slow or shallow breathing as well as physical obstruction of the airway.

Identifying the Symptoms of Sleep Apnea

The following symptoms will be experienced by anyone with sleep apnea, whether it is obstructive, central, or mixed.

  • Snoring loudly during the night
  • The feeling of choking during sleep
  • An abrupt pause in breathing during sleep, followed by a gasp
  • Sleeping with labored breathing
  • Having a dry mouth in the morning
  • Having morning headaches
  • Fatigue during the day
  • Thinking or concentrating is difficult
  • Stress and irritability 

You may not notice all of these symptoms because you sleep through all the sleep disturbances. Ask your partner if they have noticed any snoring, choking, or gasping noises, or if you have stopped breathing sometime during the night. 

Obstructive sleep apnea: What causes it?

Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when the airways become blocked. While you sleep, your tongue, throat, and neck muscles relax, causing the muscles to narrow or completely block your airway. This can cause you to stop breathing for a few seconds. Following this, your brain sends a signal that briefly wakes up your body, tightening the muscles and restarting the flow of air.

You may only be awake for a few seconds, and you may not even remember being awake. This can happen more than 30 times in an hour. The disruption of your nighttime sleep will leave you feeling exhausted, and even if you don’t remember waking up, you won’t have been able to get a deep and restful sleep.

What Causes Central Sleep Apnea? 

The causes of central sleep apnea are very different from those of obstructive sleep apnea. When a person suffers from central sleep apnea, it is the brain rather than the muscles that cause breathing problems. While you sleep, your brain continues to control your breathing muscles. When you’re sleeping, this automatic process can be disrupted, leading to shallower and slower breathing. 

Central sleep apnea can also occur when the brain does not sense how much carbon dioxide is in the body. When this happens, your breathing becomes even shallower and slower than it should be, and your body won’t receive enough oxygen. 

The cause of central sleep apnea is often a related health condition such as a stroke, an illness or infection, an injury to the brain, or even a brain tumor. Certain pain medications can also cause central sleep apnea. 

Risk Factors for Sleep Apnea

 Several behaviors or conditions can increase your risk of developing obstructive sleep apnea. The following are some of the most common risk factors for sleep apnea:

  • Such physical features as a narrow airway or enlarged tonsils can obstruct the airway.
  • Nighttime nasal congestion 
  • Breathing problems, such as asthma
  • Tobacco use
  • weight gain, which results in fat deposits around the upper airway, restricting airflow.
  • Diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • Laying on your back while sleeping

These are a few of the factors that can contribute to sleep apnea. Call our Sleep Apnea Glen Burnie office to schedule a consultation for more information regarding the types of sleep apnea and its causes. You can find out if you have sleep apnea by taking a sleep test and exploring your treatment options so you can get the rest you need.

Chesapeake Sleep Center
Phone: 410-729-6794
Url: https://chesapeakesleepapnea.com/
7711 Quarterfield Road, Suite C-1
Glen Burnie, MD 21061

Men vs. Women…Sleep Apnea Comparison | Dr. Paul Miller

Dentist Glen Burnie

It’s said that men come from Mars and women from Venus. Remember that old book about the differences between men and women? Although many things are different between the sexes, this one may surprise you: sleep apnea symptoms.

The UCLA School of Nursing published a study on women with obstructive sleep apnea and found that their symptoms are different from men’s. Health plays a major role in the differences between the two groups. It is common to think of obstructive sleep apnea patients as overweight males with serious health issues such as diabetes and high blood pressure. According to the UCLA study, however, women with obstructive sleep apnea often seem healthy. Their blood pressure is usually normal, and they have subtle symptoms. Although these can be considered positive signs, a sleep-breathing disorder is often misdiagnosed or overlooked for many women. As a result, many do not receive treatment.

What is Sleep Apnea?

Sleep apnea is a potentially serious sleep disorder and medical condition in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts while sleeping. A common cause of sleep apnea is the muscles in the throat falling into the airways, blocking airflow into the lungs. When the airflow is stopped, oxygen cannot enter the bloodstream. Organs and tissues die without oxygen, increasing your risk of serious illness and potentially life-threatening conditions.

How many people suffer from sleep apnea?

There are 22 million Americans who suffer from sleep-related breathing disorders, yet many are unaware of the condition. The condition is more likely to develop in men, but women are not exempt from risk factors. Women account for roughly 40% of patients newly diagnosed with sleep-breathing disorders.

Is Sleep Apnea a Serious Problem in Women?

Is sleep apnea serious for women whose symptoms are mild or unnoticeable? Certainly.

Sleep apnea poses serious health risks and can cause chronic illnesses, including heart disease, diabetes, and even dementia. Due to its effect on the heart and heartbeat, it can cause heart attacks and heart failure. Researchers found that while sleep apnea is terrible in men, it is even worse in women. As a result, it can lead to heart problems, including heart disease, and affect day-to-day living more seriously than it does for men.

Early detection and treatment of sleep apnea are critical for patients because they can help protect your brain and organs from damage when your blood oxygen level drops.

Sleep Apnea in Women: What Are the Signs?

  • Snoring (not always present, and not always loud or frequent)
  • Headaches in the morning, especially around the temples
  • Loss of memory
  • Problems with learning or focusing
  • A dry mouth or sore throat when you wake up.
  • Insomnia and difficulty sleeping.
  • Feeling irritable or depressed?

Some women may experience choking or gasping during sleep, which may cause them to wake up. Affected individuals may wake up but not know why they woke up in these situations. We can perform a sleep apnea test in our office to determine whether you have the condition.

Sleep Apnea and Menopause

Women after menopause are also at a higher risk for sleep-disordered breathing. Menopause can make diagnosis difficult since its symptoms are similar to those of sleep apnea. Symptoms include:

  • Periods that are irregular
  • Hot flashes
  • Having difficulty sleeping
  • Fatigue during the day
  • Concentration problems
  • Loss of memory
  • Mood swings
  • Incontinence and/or vaginal/urinary problems (dryness, infections)
  • A decrease in libido
  • Muscle or joint pain
  • Osteoporosis
  • An unexplained increase in weight

A hormonal condition such as polycystic ovary syndrome may also contribute to this condition. Women who are overweight or obese are more likely to develop sleep apnea symptoms, but thin women are also at risk.

Treatments for Sleep Apnea

Treatments for obstructive sleep apnea in women differ, just as they do in men, depending on the severity of the condition. We can help women with sleep-disordered breathing without resorting to CPAP machines. Please contact our Sleep Apnea Glen Burnie office if you are interested in learning more and we would be happy to schedule a consultation.

Chesapeake Sleep Center
Phone: 410-729-6794
Url: https://chesapeakesleepapnea.com/
7711 Quarterfield Road, Suite C-1
Glen Burnie, MD 21061

Are You Ready for Your Sleep Apnea Test? | 21061 Sleep Apnea

Glen Burnie Dentist

Sleep apnea is a common condition in which you stop breathing for short periods while you sleep. Without treatment, it can lead to significant health issues over time. If you think you have sleep apnea, your doctor may perform a nighttime sleep test that monitors your breathing.

As part of the diagnosis of sleep apnea, your doctor will ask you to fill out questionnaires to assess symptoms like daytime sleepiness and potential risk factors like high blood pressure, obesity, and age. It’s also possible to monitor your sleep in the privacy of your own home. If your symptoms and risk factors strongly suggest sleep apnea, your doctor may recommend at-home sleep monitoring.

Let’s examine the different test options available to diagnose sleep apnea.

A sleep study in a laboratory

An in-lab sleep study can diagnose sleep apnea as well as other sleep disorders.

Sleep studies are typically conducted between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. This timeframe may not be ideal for people who are night owls or early risers. At-home tests may be recommended in these cases. You’ll be staying in a private room designed to make you feel comfortable, similar to a hotel room. Make sure you bring your pajamas and any other items you usually need for sleeping.

A sleep study is noninvasive; you don’t have to give a sample of blood. You will be attached to a variety of wires, however. While you sleep, the sleep technician can monitor your breathing, brain activity, and other vital signs. The more relaxed you are, the more effectively the technician can monitor your sleep.

When you fall asleep, the technician will monitor the following:

  • Your sleep cycle, as determined by brain waves and eye movements
  • heart rate and blood pressure.
  • Your breathing, which includes oxygen levels, breathing lapses, and snoring
  • The position you are in and your limb movements

Sleep studies come in two formats: full nights and split nights.

In a full-night sleep study, your sleep will be monitored throughout the entire night. If you have been diagnosed with sleep apnea, you may need to return to the lab at a later date to set up a breathing aid device.

In a split-night study, the first half of the night is used to monitor your sleep. If sleep apnea is diagnosed, the second half of the night is used to set up the treatment device.

Sleep-testing at home

Sleep testing at home is a simplified form of laboratory testing. Instead of a technician, your sleep apnea specialist will prescribe a portable breathing monitor kit that you will take home. Your regular bedtime routine can be followed the night of the test. Ensure you hook up the monitoring sensors according to the instructions provided with the kit. 

An at-home sleep apnea monitor is usually simple to install. Typically, it includes the following components:

  • A finger clip that measures oxygen levels and heart rate.
  • A nasal cannula for measuring oxygen and airflow
  • Wearable sensors that measure your chest’s rise and fall

A home test does not measure your sleep cycles, position, or limb movements at night like an in-lab test does. Your results will be sent to your doctor following the test. You will be contacted to discuss the results and determine if treatment is necessary.

Treatment Options

Treatment for sleep apnea depends on its severity. A lifestyle change may be sufficient in some cases.

Several medical treatments are available for sleep apnea, including

  • The continuous positive airway pressure machine (CPAP)
  • Appliances for the mouth
  • A nasal device
  • Supplemental oxygen
  • Surgical procedures

Sleep apnea tests, both in the laboratory and at home, measure vital functions such as breathing patterns, heart rate, and oxygen levels. Based on the results of these tests, your doctor can determine whether you suffer from sleep apnea.

Consider scheduling an appointment with our Glen Burnie Sleep Apnea specialist if you have symptoms. We are here to help you get a good night’s sleep, so give us a call today.

Chesapeake Sleep Center
Phone: 410-729-6794
Url: https://chesapeakesleepapnea.com/
7711 Quarterfield Road, Suite C-1
Glen Burnie, MD 21061

Does My Sleep Apnea Need Help? | Sleep Apnea Treatment in Glen Burnie MD

Sleep Apnea Treatment Glen Burnie MD

Sleep apnea can make it difficult to get a good night’s sleep. If you snore, your family or partner may also have trouble sleeping. Between 50 and 70 million people suffer from sleep apnea each night in the United States. Snoring can be an inconvenience, but sleep apnea can cause more serious health issues over time, so treatment is essential.

A Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine is commonly used for individuals who suffer from a condition called obstructive sleep apnea. Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when the muscles supporting the soft tissues in your throat, such as your tongue and soft palate, relax temporarily. Your airway narrows or closes when these muscles relax, and breathing is temporarily halted. The CPAP machine uses a breathing mask to provide airflow while sleeping. Some users may feel claustrophobic or uncomfortable when wearing the mask. 

Our sleep apnea dentist in 21061 treats patients who suffer from sleep apnea in our dental office and recommend treatment options that are effective for them. Some examples are below. 

Oral devices

Oral appliances such as mouthguards provide a standard treatment option for mild cases of sleep apnea that does not require as much care and effort as CPAP. During sleep, mouthguards hold the tongue in place or ease the jaw forward, helping to open and maintain the airway. Because this appliance is smaller, it requires less maintenance.

Surgical procedures

Occasionally, a genetic condition can also result in sleep apnea. Some people are born with large tonsils or extra tissue in their throats, which can cause difficulty breathing while they are sleeping. In addition, the tongue, jaw, soft palate, and other areas may also be affected. Patients may undergo oral surgery to greatly improve their breathing while sleeping due to permanent changes in their anatomy.

Therapeutic positioning

Positioning during sleep can potentially cause sleep apnea because it hinders breathing. Research suggests sleeping on your stomach or your side can reduce the chances of developing sleep apnea. The use of devices attached to the waist or back can reduce the symptoms of sleep apnea by preventing people from lying on their backs while they sleep.

A lifestyle change might be an option for treating mild or severe sleep apnea. If you are overweight, weight loss can help reduce or eliminate the symptoms of sleep apnea. Aside from CPAP therapy, other treatment options are available for patients with sleep apnea.

 Please contact our sleep apnea dental office in Glen Burnie, MD if you have any questions about sleep apnea or if you would like to schedule a consultation.

Chesapeake Sleep Center
Phone: 410-729-6794
7711 Quarterfield Road, Suite C-1
Glen Burnie, MD 21061

Sleep Better, Live Better | Sleep Apnea Dentist in Glen Burnie

Glen Burnie MD Sleep Apnea Treatment

If you get quality sleep, you will feel refreshed the next morning. In addition to what we eat, how we act, and how we feel, sleep influences many aspects of our lives. Therefore, sleep apnea could affect you in more ways than one. The benefits of adapting your sleep pattern can benefit your day-to-day life in a number of ways.

Do not let hunger overwhelm you.

The two hormones involved in controlling appetite and stopping overeating are directly influenced by sleep. These two hormones are called leptin and ghrelin. Leptin, found in fat cells, tells your brain when you are full and suppresses your appetite. The hormone ghrelin in your stomach tells your brain that you’re hungry, and it spikes right before a meal. Sleep helps regulate these two hunger-based hormones, which prevent you from overeating or undereating.

Discussions that are more productive.

Getting a good night’s sleep can help you avoid arguments with your partner. People who are sleep-deprived tend to be more irritable and less patient. It’s proven that better sleep will make you more productive and civil in your disagreements.

In their Psychoneuroendocrinology journal, Ohio State University researchers examined 43 couples who had disagreements while they were sleep-deprived. Couples with less sleep argued more aggressively than those with more sleep the night before. In addition, the study showed that conflicts were less hostile when one partner received adequate sleep for consecutive nights.

A better quality of life

A separate study shared by our sleep apnea dentist in 21061 found that a lack of sleep is associated with increased inflammation after an argument. Chronic inflammation is implicated in many diseases, including heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and depression. Researchers found that a one-hour difference in sleep could affect inflammation. Sleep apnea is usually associated with a lack of sleep, which leads to health problems. Sleep apnea can be treated, and our dental office can recommend a treatment that may help you.

Improved mental health

Scientists have discovered that the brain needs one hour offline to process all the information it has acquired during the two hours it has been awake. Although the exact mechanisms of sleep and cognition are still being studied, sleep allows your brain to consolidate learning from the previous day, allowing it to utilize that information in the future.

Is there anything I can do to get a better night’s sleep?

Our dental office can help if you have difficulty sleeping due to obstructive sleep apnea. With the experience and compassion of our team, we can help you sleep better at night. Please contact our sleep apnea dental office in Glen Burnie for a sleep apnea consultation.

Chesapeake Sleep Center
Phone: 410-729-6794
7711 Quarterfield Road, Suite C-1
Glen Burnie, MD 21061

Managing Sleep Apnea at High Altitudes | 21061 Sleep Apnea Dentist

Glen Burnie Sleep Apnea Treatment

It is common for people to have trouble sleeping when traveling at high altitudes. Lack of oxygen at high altitudes affects your ability to sleep since your body undergoes a series of adjustments known as acclimatization. Sleep apnea symptoms can affect a wide range of people. However, those who already suffer from them may find it more challenging to adjust. 

Sleep apnea is a disorder that occurs when someone’s breathing is interrupted while they are asleep. Sleep apnea patients stop breathing repeatedly during their sleep, sometimes hundreds of times. Sleep apnea can cause various health problems, including hypertension (high blood pressure), stroke, cardiomyopathy (enlargement of the muscle tissue in the heart), heart failure, diabetes, and heart attacks. Additionally, untreated sleep apnea can lead to job impairment, work-related accidents, motor vehicle accidents, as well as underachievement in school in children and adolescents.

In the event that you suffer from sleep apnea, we can address these potential problems head-on as well as prepare you for your trip to higher altitudes. Our dentist in Glen Burnie will suggest a few things to help you have a restful and rejuvenating night’s sleep, including the following:

  • Make sure you pack your CPAP machine and use it when traveling to areas where symptoms might worsen. If you do not use a CPAP machine, speak with your doctor before traveling to a high altitude about the possibility of using a CPAP or dental appliance. 
  • While at a high altitude, it is best to ascend slowly and drink adequate amounts of water. As the Institute for Altitude Medicine explains, your body loses water twice as quickly by respiration at high altitudes as it does at sea level, and dehydration can impact your sleep patterns. Pack several bottles of water in your carry-on bags so that you will have them available when needed.
  • When staying in an area with a higher elevation, sleeping on the ground floor or even in a lower elevation room will help offset the effects of your sleep apnea.
  • If you suffer from severe altitude sickness, you may need to consult with your doctor about prescribing medication.

People with sleep apnea face unique challenges when traveling to high-elevation destinations. With careful planning in advance, you can easily achieve a restful and relaxing trip.

A wide range of treatment options are available for sleep apnea. For more information or to schedule a consultation, please feel free to contact our Glen Burnie, MD dental office.

Chesapeake Sleep Center
Phone: 410-729-6794
7711 Quarterfield Road, Suite C-1
Glen Burnie, MD 21061

Snoring Severity: Is it Bad for You? | Glen Burnie Sleep Apnea Treatment

Sleep Apnea Dentist Near Me

Snoring can be loud and incredibly annoying for people who are trying to sleep nearby. It can result in many sleepless nights and elaborate revenge plans for many frustrated sleeping partners. People often ignore snoring, but it may be a sign of a more serious condition.

Snoring occurs when airflow is restricted while you sleep. Long-term or loud snoring increases the risk of heart attacks and strokes. Snoring may be prevented by losing weight and avoiding alcohol before bed. Our sleep apnea dentist in 21061 can provide treatment options if it keeps you awake or disrupts the sleep of your partner.

Besides the psychological effects of snoring, it can also negatively impact the quality of your life. Snoring is a symptom of a sleeping disorder called sleep apnea. The National Sleep Foundation estimates that snoring affects nearly 90 million Americans today. Over half of those people suffer from sleep apnea. However, snoring alone doesn’t necessarily mean you have a form of sleep apnea. 

Snoring is often associated with a condition known as obstructive sleep apnea. Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when something blocks part or all of your upper airway while you’re sleeping. Your breathing can become shallow or even stop temporarily. There may be times when you do not sleep well, but you may not be aware that it is happening. Additionally, the condition can decrease oxygen flow to the organs and lead to irregular heart rhythms.

These are some of the symptoms commonly associated with obstructive sleep apnea.

  • Insomnia
  • Having difficulty concentrating during the day.
  • When you wake up, your mouth feels dry or you have a sore throat.
  • Snoring loudly
  • A sudden awakening accompanied by gasping or choking.
  • Morning headaches

It’s extremely unlikely that sleep apnea can lead to death, and the symptoms won’t just cause you to stop breathing. However, OSA can increase your risk of potentially fatal health conditions, some of which may cause sudden death.

Having sleep-disordered breathing for a long period of time can have serious health consequences. It may increase the risk of high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disease. In addition, it can lead to depression and memory problems, increase daytime sleepiness, and increase the risk of accidents. Obstructive sleep apnea is not fatal on its own, but it can cause a number of problems that can threaten your life. For that reason, treating sleep apnea is vital to your health.

We are fortunate to be able to offer a wide range of treatment options for sleep apnea. For more information, please contact our dental office in Glen Burnie, MD.

Chesapeake Sleep Center
Phone: 410-729-6794
7711 Quarterfield Road, Suite C-1
Glen Burnie, MD 21061