Need a Nap? Sleep Apnea May be Your Problem | Sleep Apnea 21061

Woman asleep on laptop Sleep Apnea Near Me

Millions of Americans suffer from sleep apnea, causing them to have trouble sleeping, drowsiness during the day, and fatigue at night. It’s a serious condition that makes it hard to breathe at night and can block the air moving into and out of the lungs. Sleep apnea causes poor sleep as well as a number of other health issues. 

There are three types of sleep apnea that might affect your breathing during the night.

  • Obstructive sleep apnea is the most common type of sleep apnea. During this condition, the muscles in the back of the throat relax, closing the airway and physically blocking your lungs.
  • Central sleep apnea is less common and originates in the brain. During sleep, your brain fails to control your breathing muscles. This will cause shallow or slow breathing, or even breathing pauses.
  • Mixed sleep apnea occurs when a person has both obstructive and central sleep apnea. This type of sleep apnea is characterized by slow or shallow breathing as well as physical obstruction of the airway.

Identifying the Symptoms of Sleep Apnea

The following symptoms will be experienced by anyone with sleep apnea, whether it is obstructive, central, or mixed.

  • Snoring loudly during the night
  • The feeling of choking during sleep
  • An abrupt pause in breathing during sleep, followed by a gasp
  • Sleeping with labored breathing
  • Having a dry mouth in the morning
  • Having morning headaches
  • Fatigue during the day
  • Thinking or concentrating is difficult
  • Stress and irritability 

You may not notice all of these symptoms because you sleep through all the sleep disturbances. Ask your partner if they have noticed any snoring, choking, or gasping noises, or if you have stopped breathing sometime during the night. 

Obstructive sleep apnea: What causes it?

Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when the airways become blocked. While you sleep, your tongue, throat, and neck muscles relax, causing the muscles to narrow or completely block your airway. This can cause you to stop breathing for a few seconds. Following this, your brain sends a signal that briefly wakes up your body, tightening the muscles and restarting the flow of air.

You may only be awake for a few seconds, and you may not even remember being awake. This can happen more than 30 times in an hour. The disruption of your nighttime sleep will leave you feeling exhausted, and even if you don’t remember waking up, you won’t have been able to get a deep and restful sleep.

What Causes Central Sleep Apnea? 

The causes of central sleep apnea are very different from those of obstructive sleep apnea. When a person suffers from central sleep apnea, it is the brain rather than the muscles that cause breathing problems. While you sleep, your brain continues to control your breathing muscles. When you’re sleeping, this automatic process can be disrupted, leading to shallower and slower breathing. 

Central sleep apnea can also occur when the brain does not sense how much carbon dioxide is in the body. When this happens, your breathing becomes even shallower and slower than it should be, and your body won’t receive enough oxygen. 

The cause of central sleep apnea is often a related health condition such as a stroke, an illness or infection, an injury to the brain, or even a brain tumor. Certain pain medications can also cause central sleep apnea. 

Risk Factors for Sleep Apnea

 Several behaviors or conditions can increase your risk of developing obstructive sleep apnea. The following are some of the most common risk factors for sleep apnea:

  • Such physical features as a narrow airway or enlarged tonsils can obstruct the airway.
  • Nighttime nasal congestion 
  • Breathing problems, such as asthma
  • Tobacco use
  • weight gain, which results in fat deposits around the upper airway, restricting airflow.
  • Diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • Laying on your back while sleeping

These are a few of the factors that can contribute to sleep apnea. Call our Sleep Apnea Glen Burnie office to schedule a consultation for more information regarding the types of sleep apnea and its causes. You can find out if you have sleep apnea by taking a sleep test and exploring your treatment options so you can get the rest you need.

Chesapeake Sleep Center
Phone: 410-729-6794
Url: https://chesapeakesleepapnea.com/
7711 Quarterfield Road, Suite C-1
Glen Burnie, MD 21061

Men vs. Women…Sleep Apnea Comparison | Dr. Paul Miller

Dentist Glen Burnie

It’s said that men come from Mars and women from Venus. Remember that old book about the differences between men and women? Although many things are different between the sexes, this one may surprise you: sleep apnea symptoms.

The UCLA School of Nursing published a study on women with obstructive sleep apnea and found that their symptoms are different from men’s. Health plays a major role in the differences between the two groups. It is common to think of obstructive sleep apnea patients as overweight males with serious health issues such as diabetes and high blood pressure. According to the UCLA study, however, women with obstructive sleep apnea often seem healthy. Their blood pressure is usually normal, and they have subtle symptoms. Although these can be considered positive signs, a sleep-breathing disorder is often misdiagnosed or overlooked for many women. As a result, many do not receive treatment.

What is Sleep Apnea?

Sleep apnea is a potentially serious sleep disorder and medical condition in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts while sleeping. A common cause of sleep apnea is the muscles in the throat falling into the airways, blocking airflow into the lungs. When the airflow is stopped, oxygen cannot enter the bloodstream. Organs and tissues die without oxygen, increasing your risk of serious illness and potentially life-threatening conditions.

How many people suffer from sleep apnea?

There are 22 million Americans who suffer from sleep-related breathing disorders, yet many are unaware of the condition. The condition is more likely to develop in men, but women are not exempt from risk factors. Women account for roughly 40% of patients newly diagnosed with sleep-breathing disorders.

Is Sleep Apnea a Serious Problem in Women?

Is sleep apnea serious for women whose symptoms are mild or unnoticeable? Certainly.

Sleep apnea poses serious health risks and can cause chronic illnesses, including heart disease, diabetes, and even dementia. Due to its effect on the heart and heartbeat, it can cause heart attacks and heart failure. Researchers found that while sleep apnea is terrible in men, it is even worse in women. As a result, it can lead to heart problems, including heart disease, and affect day-to-day living more seriously than it does for men.

Early detection and treatment of sleep apnea are critical for patients because they can help protect your brain and organs from damage when your blood oxygen level drops.

Sleep Apnea in Women: What Are the Signs?

  • Snoring (not always present, and not always loud or frequent)
  • Headaches in the morning, especially around the temples
  • Loss of memory
  • Problems with learning or focusing
  • A dry mouth or sore throat when you wake up.
  • Insomnia and difficulty sleeping.
  • Feeling irritable or depressed?

Some women may experience choking or gasping during sleep, which may cause them to wake up. Affected individuals may wake up but not know why they woke up in these situations. We can perform a sleep apnea test in our office to determine whether you have the condition.

Sleep Apnea and Menopause

Women after menopause are also at a higher risk for sleep-disordered breathing. Menopause can make diagnosis difficult since its symptoms are similar to those of sleep apnea. Symptoms include:

  • Periods that are irregular
  • Hot flashes
  • Having difficulty sleeping
  • Fatigue during the day
  • Concentration problems
  • Loss of memory
  • Mood swings
  • Incontinence and/or vaginal/urinary problems (dryness, infections)
  • A decrease in libido
  • Muscle or joint pain
  • Osteoporosis
  • An unexplained increase in weight

A hormonal condition such as polycystic ovary syndrome may also contribute to this condition. Women who are overweight or obese are more likely to develop sleep apnea symptoms, but thin women are also at risk.

Treatments for Sleep Apnea

Treatments for obstructive sleep apnea in women differ, just as they do in men, depending on the severity of the condition. We can help women with sleep-disordered breathing without resorting to CPAP machines. Please contact our Sleep Apnea Glen Burnie office if you are interested in learning more and we would be happy to schedule a consultation.

Chesapeake Sleep Center
Phone: 410-729-6794
Url: https://chesapeakesleepapnea.com/
7711 Quarterfield Road, Suite C-1
Glen Burnie, MD 21061